COSTUMES (CONCEPT/STYLE)

FOLLOWING BRECTH’S LEAD: THE ARTISTIC ( JASON: KUNSTLICHE ?  like Kunststoff) ASPECTS OF THE COSTUME WILL BE EMPHASIZED.  THE PERIOD IS SOMETIME IN THE 20TH CENTURY, WITHOUT FEAR OF ANACHRONISM.

The actual costumes will capture the spirit of costumes sketches.  Because of my deep affinity for the Weimar Period and Expressionism, I expect that we will see echoes of George Grosz.  The costumes will be constructed from fabric collected as part of a recycling of the theater students’, faculty’s, and staffs’  old clothes. Claudia and I discussed color coding each of the characters or groups of characters; this concept is in development.  We will cut the costume pieces from our recycled clothing in some cases, and use existing pieces in other cases. Color will be manipualted with dying (minimal) and painting. Detail will be added with paint, embroidery, drawing, and applique of various materials.

 

This is an early sketch of Polly’s wedding costume. While the specifics have changed through collaboration with Claudia, the drawing demonstrates the spirit which the costumes should have: rough, improvisational, expressive, energetic.  I will upload a revised sketch this week.


George Grosz uses a very quick energetic line, not erasing the “wrong line”, giving us xray vision, which we see here in this early sketch of the prostitute costume.  We are now talking about using photographic elements (say of one breast) along with embroidered and drawn elements. (The shift is not sheer:  the body parts are kunstliche elements).

 

 

In Europe the working class traditionally wears “blue blouses”  (also the name of a Russian theater movement of the early revolutionary period).  Even today you will see the tradesmen of European cities wearing blue coats (like lab coats) or jump suits. The USA version is the blue work shirt and blue jeans, which is what I propose to use to construct these costumes.

 

 

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